​Information and FAQs

ABA Therapy Brooklyn NY, Home based ABA Therapy agency providing services to children on the autism spectrum in the NYC area (Brooklyn, Queens, Bronx, Staten Island, Manhattan)

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In-home ABA Services in the Tri-State Area
Contact us today for more information
​Tel:   (315)975-2405
Fax:  (347)412-6028
info@NYCenterforAutismTreatment.com

                               

                     New York Office: 718-484-9219  

                                  Office Fax: 347-412-6028    


ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

ABA therapy Brooklyn, NY

Home based ABA Therapy provided to children on the autism spectrum in the NYC area (Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Bronx, Staten Island.)  Most insurances accepted.  We are an ABA company providing home based therapy for children on the Autism spectrum ages 0-21 in NYS and surrounding areas.Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapy treats all symptoms of an autism diagnosis.  Home based ABA Therapy provided to children on the autism spectrum in the NYC area (Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Bronx, Staten Island.)  Most insurances accepted.  Home based ABA Therapy provided to children on the autism spectrum in the NYC area (Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Bronx, Staten Island.)  Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) Therapy treats all symptoms of an autism diagnosis.  Most insurances accepted.  Home based ABA Therapy provided to children on the autism spectrum in the NYC area (Brooklyn, Manhattan, Queens, Bronx, Staten Island.)  Most insurances accepted.



What is autism?  Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by impaired social and communication skills, as well as restricted interests and repetitive behaviors.

Common signs that a child is on the spectrum:
  It is important to note that children on the spectrum can have all or few of the symptoms below.  No two individuals on the spectrum are the same. 

  • Avoidance of eye contact
  • Failure to recognize or respond to their own name
  • Lack of interest in or response to other people
  • Not using gestures before vocal communication begins (e.g. pointing to desired objects)
  • Delayed/absence of verbal language
  • Delayed gross and fine motor skills
  • Unusual reactions to the way things feel, sound, smell, taste and feel
  • Obsessive interests
  • Difficulty transitioning (difficulty processing change)
  • Unusual repetitive behaviors (i.e. hand flapping, spinning objects, lining up objects)


What is Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA)?  ABA is a scientific approach for discovering environmental variables that reliably influence socially significant behavior & for developing a technique for behavior change.  In other words, ABA discovers what behaviors a child needs to improve or decrease, and manipulates their environment to either develop a skill or decrease a behavior (e.g. a child who tantrums due to difficulties communicating his or her wants will be taught ways to effectively communicate what they want without having to engage in a tantrum).

What is a socially significant behavior?  Socially significant behaviors are those that are important for a person to do (or not to do) in order to successfully function within their environment (i.e. home, school, community, etc.)

Will my child benefit from ABA therapy?  ABA has been proven to improve socially significant behaviors; therefore, if your child maintains any behavioral deficit, your child will benefit from ABA therapy.  ABA addresses all levels of need, from those struggling with language, to those who have difficulties with social skills.  ABA uses evidence based applied science to bring meaningful and positive change to any behavioral need.  

How are therapy sessions developed?  When a child is referred to NY Center for Autism Treatment for ABA services, we will send a licensed evaluator to conduct a Milestone Assessment.  The assessment will go through each milestone level and identify any deficits (e.g. social skill milestones: some children will be able to play with other children, but only talk to other children about their own interests, leaving the other child no reason to participate in the relationship).  In this scenario, this child will be taught that it is important to also speak to other children about their interests as well, to improve the chances of a natural relationship forming.  This is taught with the use of modeling, role-playing, social games and stories, as well as incidental and generalization training.

Based on the Milestone Assessment results, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA) will develop programs for the child to begin therapy.  Therefore, every child’s programming is individualized, based upon their specific needs.  Some children may need assistance with language and communication skills, others may need assistance staying on task to complete their homework; our trained staff will prioritize program goals and work with your child to address every behavioral need.


Examples of common programs:

  • Social skill programs:  Early learners will work on eye contact, playing near other children, and following/imitating their peers.  Programs are introduced delicately to ensure that the child is comfortable with achieving each aspect of a milestone and open to moving on to the next step.  Later, children will work on looking at a peer when they are talking, initiating physical interactions with peers (e.g. playing tag), requesting from peers (e.g. “push me!”) and later increasing the amount of time engaging with peers reciprocally.  Therapists work on these goals initially in-home, role-playing with the child, utilizing social-stories, bringing in siblings or other family members, and later discretely working the program into the community (e.g. therapist can take the child to the park and prompt the child to play with or initiate play with other children).​
  • Fine motor/writing skills:  A child who presents difficulty with fine motor skills such as writing, may need to practice the skill, improve motor planning skills, as well as strengthen the muscles in his hands.  An ABA program will address all aspects of the deficit separately to not overwhelm the child, and to not expect a skill that is too difficult for them to perform, which typically encourages noncompliance.  Therapists will encourage writing activities based upon skill level to encourage practice of the skill, introduce activities to improvement of motor planning (e.g. games with small pieces) and muscle strengthening (e.g. activities with putty, games using tongs, etc.)


Common MYTHS & MISCONCEPTIONS about ABA: 

ABA is not scientifically proven to be effective:  As mentioned above, ABA is an evidence based applied science.  There is an overwhelming number of professional journals that have proven its effectiveness.  In addition, ABA is the only autism therapy recommended for long-term benefit by The United States Surgeon General.​
ABA is repetitive training/robot like:  This is a false misconception as well, stemming from the breakdown and training of tasks.  Children may require the breakdown of a specific task (e.g. dressing).Therefore, a child may be working on putting on a shirt, so a therapist may put the shirt on a child’s head, and request that they pull it down.  When the child pulls down the shirt, the therapist may put it back and request that they do it again.  Each time is praised (e.g. verbal: “great job! Let’s try it again!”)  This repetition is important for the skill to be developed and maintained, however, this is hardly an entire ABA session, or how all programs are implemented.  In addition, all ABA programs include naturalistic and generalization training, to ensure the skill can be practiced naturally, within all contexts (e.g. the child spontaneously practicing the learned skills without being prompted, completing the skill for all family members, and within all settings).
ABA uses snacks and toys to bribe children to complete a task:  ABA places heavy emphasis within the power of reinforcement.  All behaviors must be reinforced to continue to be practiced: adults go to work and are reinforced with payment; an infant hits a mobile for the reinforcement of it moving or for music to turn on.  Reinforcement encourages natural repetition.Therefore, when a child completes a new task that they are working towards in therapy (e.g. pulling on his or her shirt), the therapist will provide reinforcement (e.g. verbal praise “great job!”)Typically, ABA therapy does not involve edible reinforcers, unless it is absolutely necessary.  Some children may not be highly motivated by verbal praise and may require more, which can include time on a new and exciting toy, or an exciting snack.  Reinforcers are important to make the child want to work for that exciting end result.  If edible reinforcers are ever used, they are faded out as quickly as possible, which is typically quite simple because as a task is practiced, it becomes easier for the child and requires less reinforcement for its completion.




Contact us today to discuss how to get started!